TF exhibiting at ACPA’s 71st Annual Meeting

March 20th, 2014 by

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TF will be exhibiting at the ACPA’s 71st Annual Meeting  from March 24-29, 2014 in Indianapolis, IN!

Drop by our booth to discuss our Comprehensive Cleft Management Toolkit (CCMT). We are working to optimize the workflow and clinical management of our partner teams.  A key part of this process is putting essential information at the fingertips of front-line health workers. 

We are piloting the CCMT project in Argentina and Peru and we hope that the toolkit will allow our partners streamline their clinical processes and document outcomes. In producing the CCMT, TF seeks to promote complete, patient-centered cleft care in developing countries. Stop by our booth to learn more! 

In addition to our exhibit booth, TF will be honouring one of our partners, Maria Teresa Torres de Salcedo, who has been chosen as the recipient of the 2014 CPF Leadership Award. She will be honoured at the ACPA annual award luncheon in Indianapolis, Indiana on Thursday March 27, 2014.

The CPF Leadership Award recognizes an individual or group (non ACPA member) that has demonstrated exceptional service and leadership on behalf of individuals with cleft or craniofacial anomalies and is awarded at the Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA). 

Hope to see you at our booth! 

 

 

 

 


Media Advisory: Peruvian Cleft Lip and Palate Leader Visits Toronto

March 14th, 2014 by

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Maria Teresa, Sayuri and NancyTransforming Faces (TF) is a Canadian charity that works with local partners to provide multidisciplinary cleft care in developing countries. Maria Teresa Torres de Salcedo, from Lima, Peru, has inspired many patients and their families with her humble and determined approach.

Peru has one of the highest rates of cleft lip and palate in South America, occurring in one of every 500 live births. A major barrier to care was the lengthy transportation times faced by families.

Maria Teresa created KusiRostros, a nonprofit that provides cleft lip and palate rehabilitation services through four community rehabilitation centers (CRCs), which have allowed families to receive free treatment close to home. 

In the first year, a total of 240 children were treated through four CRCs and an additional CRC was added to meet demand. The travel times have been cut from 2 hours to 20 minutes for most families. 

“Maria Teresa has been a driving force in cleft care in Peru. She has inspired and empowered many people while also ensuring that children get the best possible care,” said Esteban Lasso, TF’s Executive Director.

Maria Teresa has been chosen as the recipient of the 2014 CPF Leadership Award. The CPF Leadership Award recognizes an individual or group that has demonstrated exceptional service and leadership on behalf of individuals with cleft or craniofacial anomalies.  She will be honoured at the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) annual award luncheon in Indianapolis on Thursday March 27, 2014.

Maria Teresa will be visiting Toronto from March 17-21, 2014 and is available for interviews.  For more information about Maria Teresa, please click here

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About Transforming Faces

Transforming Faces is a Canadian charity that empowers local multidisciplinary medical teams to provide free comprehensive cleft lip and palate care for children and adults in developing countries. This allows children to live full, healthy lives. TF partners with KusiRostros in Peru. Visit www.transformingfaces.org for more information.

For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact:

Debbie Silva, Communications Coordinator
Transforming Faces
344 Bloor Street West, Suite 208
Toronto, Ontario
M5S 3A7
416 222 6581
debbie@transformingfaces.org
www.transformingfaces.org

Pictured: Maria Teresa, in blue, with Sayuri and her mother Nancy


Meet TF’s Peruvian partner at OCIC’s Focus in Development session

March 12th, 2014 by

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Maria Teresa Torres de Salcedo, from Lima, Peru, has inspired many patients and their families with her humble and determined approach.

Peru has one of the highest rates of cleft lip and palate in South America, occurring in one of every 500 live births. A major barrier to care was the lengthy transportation times faced by families.

Maria Teresa created KusiRostros, a nonprofit that provides cleft lip and palate rehabilitation services through four community rehabilitation centers (CRCs), which have allowed families to receive free treatment close to home. 

In the first year, a total of 240 children were treated through four CRCs and an additional CRC was added to meet demand. The travel times have been cut from 2 hours to 20 minutes for most families. 

Want to know more about decentralized healthcare? Want to meet TF’s partner?

Join us at OCIC Focus in Development: Is Decentralized Healthcare the Best Approach? Lessons Learned from Peru on Friday, March 21 from 12 noon to 2pm in Toronto. The session will be held at Volunteer Toronto  at 344 Bloor St W, Suite 404, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3A7. 

In countries where healthcare is scarce or inaccessible, one strategy is to relocate services from hospitals to peripheral health facilities or outside of health facilities altogether. This process of
decentralization aims to position healthcare more fully in the community and allow patients to continue their care.

In this session we will discuss the challenges and victories of decentralized care, empowering local health professionals and families, overcoming barriers to care (such as local stigmas and transportation), creating alliances with hospitals and organizations, and the importance of monitoring health outcomes.

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!


Comprehensive Cleft Management Toolkit (CCMT)

March 11th, 2014 by

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Empowering our Partners

We are working to optimize the workflow and clinical management of our partner teams.  A key part of this process is putting essential information at the fingertips of front-line health workers. 

We are currently developing the CCMT toolkit to help our partners streamline their clinical processes and document outcomes. 

Eventually, the CCMT will help our partner’s transition to electronic medical records.

Why?

In producing the CCMT, TF seeks to promote complete, patient-centered cleft care in developing countries.

The toolkit will help teams assess their impact, participate in research, and share knowledge with the international cleft community.  Patients will receive more efficient case management and more timely and appropriate care.

Current status:

We are piloting the CCMT project in Argentina and Peru. We have researched the experience of other organizations and explored the unique needs of our partner organizations.

Lessons Learned

o             Form standardization will be one of the most important – and difficult – steps of the process. 

o             Partner buy-in and commitment to change management is critical for project success.

o             A standardized paper-based workflow must be implemented before seeking  software-based solutions.

o             Piloting the program has already improved teamwork and encouraged our partners to think critically about their processes.

Next Steps: Looking for your Help

We seek to exchange knowledge with teams with experienced in patient-centered, team-based management systems. 

We want to hear from you!

o             We will be documenting and sharing these findings with the broader cleft community.

o             Over the next two years, we will pilot new clinical forms in project sites and roll out this system more widely.

Have you done something similar? How did it work? Want to get updates about this project?

Let us know in the comment section!

 


Happy Social Work Month!

March 1st, 2014 by

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March is Social Work Month!

Parent Support GroupWhen a baby is born with cleft lip or palate, it’s vital that the attending medical team offers parents immediate support and information on care options. 

Social workers and psychologists help new parents address any challenging circumstances or emotions they may be experiencing. For older children who have gone without cleft treatment, counselling helps overcome any negative experiences and helps them adjust to transformation.

In Ethiopia, as in many developing countries, the social work profession is still in its infancy.

However, the team at Yekatit 12 recognized the importance of social work for guiding patients and families through the treatment process and for equipping children with tools to adapt to school and community life.

Recently, a volunteer team from Toronto, including Farah Sheikh, Clinical Social Worker with SickKids and Adjunct Practice Professor, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto and TF Medical Advisory Committee Volunteer, visited Ethiopia to assess the team and provide training. 

She was able to assist the Ethiopian team with their social work efforts. 

“I had the opportunity to help facilitate the Parent Support Group for the Cleft lip and Palate (CLP) program at Yekatit. The mothers and children were inspiring,” Sheikh said. “I met the most amazing parents, most who travelled from remote villages to Addis – so that their child could have a CLP surgery.” 

“The two main struggles are nutrition – children with cleft palates cannot create suction and therefore cannot breastfeed or drink from a traditional bottle, the other is the cultural stigma associated with a CLP,” she added. “CLP is very stigmatizing, families can be isolated, many keep their children hidden until the surgery has happened – to protect them from hateful words. Most children with unrepaired cleft lip and palate do not attend school as the stigma and bullying is so severe. The long term psychological effects can be devastating.”

This young man received his cleft palate repair at 18yrs old. He completed University and now has a great job with the government. He is just one of the many determined and inspiring people I was able to meet.

“This young man received his cleft palate repair at 18 years old. He completed University and now has a great job with the government. He is just one of the many determined and inspiring people I was able to meet,” said Sheikh. 

The teens, Heirut (Social Worker) and I.

“These are the inspiring teenagers I got to spend time with during a teen support group I helped facilitate,” said Sheikh. 

Farah, far left, and Hirut Mengistu, far right, are pictured with patients. Hirut divides her time at Yekatit 12 between social work and speech therapy. She leads parent group discussions, provides counselling and intake services.  

Photos courtesy of Farah Sheikh